Dianne Hausler
Art, Photography, Lifestyle
Welcome
Beautiful Queensland
Wildlife
Marine Life
Cartoons
Dianne's Artwork
Koalas
Mammals
Birds
Butterflies & Moths
Snakes
Lizards
Worms
Insects
Arachnids
Frogs
Orchids
Weeds
Coastal Wetlands
Beach Plants
Other Flora
Koalas
Koala at Tarradarrapin WetlandsBehaviour: Solitary. Koalas spend a vast majority of time resting in eucalyptus trees and eating their leaves.
Diet: Leaves from a variety of eucalypt trees.
Habitat:
Bushland that contain eucalypt trees.
Lifespan:
10-15 years.
Weight: 4-13.5kg
Status: Vulnerable in South East Queensland.


URGENT - HELP SAVE OUR ICONIC SPECIES!

The koala population has dropped by 50% over the last few years.

It's been reported that in 2008 there were less than 2300 koalas living in the Koala Coast of South East Queensland.

Koalas are threatened by cars, dogs, loss of habitat and disease.

HOW YOU CAN HELP

Join a local bushcare group and participate with hands-on projects such as tree planting, spotlight nights and fauna surveys.

Report sick or injured koalas (click on links to access contact details):
The Australian Wildlife Hospital - Beerwah, Queensland.
Redland's Wildlife Care Network - Redland City, Queensland. 

Donate to a worthy organisation that strives to protect koalas and their habitat:
The Australian Koala Foundation
The Australian Wildlife Hospital

Learn more about koalas.
Organisations with great websites:
Australia Zoo
Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary 
The Australian Koala Foundation
The Daisy Hill Koala Centre 
Queensland Government's 'Koalas' web page

Recommended reading:

Koala: Origins of an Icon, by Stephen Jackson. ISBN: 978-1-74175-031-7


Did you know:Koala at Tarradarrapin Wetlands
  • Koalas have two thumbs on each front paw.  
  • Newborns weigh only 0.5 grams and are the size of a human thumbnail.
  • Eucalyptus leaves are toxic to most animals, except koalas.
  • Scientific name: Phascolarctos cinereus .
  • Baby koalas are called joeys .
  • Koalas breed once a year.

The Demise of the Iconic

Since the beginning of the 19th century, indigenous wildlife was excessively hunted by settlers for their soft fur pelts. These animals were entirely helpless in the face of merciless hunters and their dogs. By the late 19th century a yearly estimate of 300,000 Koala pelts was shipped to England, to supply the lucrative American and British fur market. By the early 1930's hunters nearly eliminated the entire koala population in the southern regions of Australia.

In 1898, a Victorian legislation to halt the killing of koalas was passed; however, it seems this was unable to be enforced. In 1908, more than 57,933 koala pelts passed through the Sydney fur export market alone, and hunting spread to Queensland. By 1915, year-round hunting of Koalas was permitted.

After a public outcry in 1921, the Queensland Government banned the hunting season. However, due to commercial pressure the government did a back flip that resulted in a reopening of koala hunting – this then lasted for an additional five years. In 1927, during a one month season, 584,738 koalas were killed. Koala hunting was eventually outlawed in the 1930's.

Since the beginning of the 19th century, indigenous wildlife was excessively hunted by settlers for their soft fur pelts. These animals were entirely helpless in the face of merciless hunters and their dogs. By the late 19th century a yearly estimate of 300,000 Koala pelts was shipped to England, to supply the lucrative American and British fur market. By the early 1930's hunters nearly eliminated the entire koala population in the southern regions of Australia.

In 1898, a Victorian legislation to halt the killing of koalas was passed; however, it seems this was unable to be enforced. In 1908, more than 57,933 koala pelts passed through the Sydney fur export market alone, and hunting spread to Queensland. By 1915, year round hunting of Koalas was permitted.

After a public outcry in 1921, the Queensland Government banned the hunting season. However, due to commercial pressure the government did a back flip that resulted in a reopening of koala hunting – this then lasted for an additional five years. In 1927, during a one month season, approximately 584,738 koalas were killed. Koala hunting was eventually outlawed in the 1930's.

Sadly, koalas today still face extinction through to habitat loss and disease. The continued push for development – especially in South East Queensland – threatens to destroy the remaining pockets of eucalyptus forests. Destruction of their food source and habitat place their future in jeopardy.

    Koala Supporters
Deborah Tabart
Deborah Tabart OAM
Chief Executive Officer
Australian Koala Foundation
"There is no time to waste. Glimpsing a wild koala in its natural habitat may be a thing of the past in a few short years – a memory treasured by older generations, an experience unattainable to younger generations.

The heartbreaking decline of the koala population in recent years indicates to me that if the State and Federal Governments continue to ignore the calamitous situation the koala will be extinct within a couple of years.

We as a nation must send a strong message to our government ministers that the loss of our national icon is unacceptable. We must act now. Visit
www.savethekoala.com to find out how you can help."

Australian Wildlife Hospital
"The South-East Queensland koala population is suffering dramatic decline as a result of habitat loss and disease. The Australian Wildlife Hospital is a leading collaborator on projects with others who are investigating koala diseases to help save our national icon. We can choose to do nothing, or we, as a nation, can come together and help save the koala. We need every Australian to help contribute."
Jenny Miller
Jenny Miller
Environmental Scientist
"The iconic koala is a recognisable international symbol of Australia, yet we do little to protect them as Australian wildlife. What message would we send to the world if we allow this national treasure to disappear from nature?"
Baz Bardoe
Baz Bardoe
Musician/Environmental Project Manager

"Koalas are not just cute, they are iconic, and symbolic of so much that we know and love of this land. You can be sure that when their numbers dwindle it is a sign that we are facing an ecological catastrophe – even if we are not able to fully recognise the early warning signs just yet. Don't leave it too late!"



Peter Ludlow
Local Author

"For twenty years I have been writing about Moreton Bay’s history as seen through the eyes of its ‘locals’. In part, my aim was to preserve, in print at least, Moreton Bay as it once was, because the Bay, like everywhere else, is changing rapidly. Koalas, too, are ‘locals’, but are not able to recount for us the ‘good old days’. They need people like Dianne and YOU to speak on their behalf. I hope in the years to come that I will never have to write of Moreton Bay’s Koalas as a vanished species. We need to act, while there is still time."


10101010101000001000100011000000101000001100000010101010110011001111000011000000110011001000100011001100111100001000100011111111
WelcomeBeautiful QueenslandWildlifeMarine LifeCartoonsDianne's Artwork